New presidency stirs new fears

2016-2017 Senior Staff, Opinion 1 Comment on New presidency stirs new fears 41
New presidency stirs new fears
3 60% 6 votes

by Nicole Garofalo, staff reporter

On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump was announced to be the next President of the United States. While many rejoiced in the news, some were indifferent, and others were in despair.

“I wouldn’t rather Hillary, but I guess you can’t really do anything about it or change it,” freshman Charlie Lomonaco said.

Minorities, immigrants, women, and people of the LGBTQ+ community protesting after Trump is elected to office. Photo attribution to TomthunkitsMind on Twitter.

Minorities, immigrants, women, and people of the LGBTQ+ community protesting after Trump is elected to office. Photo attribution to TomthunkitsMind on Twitter.

Americans across the country were shaken to the core, and this has even led to protests in cities, such as Los Angeles and Manhattan. Those who are minorities, immigrants, women, or part of the LGBTQ+ community fear for the lives and rights of themselves, as well as their families and friends.

“I’m gay, but I don’t feel like Trump’s presidency will affect me as much. But I’m friends with somebody who’s transgender, and somebody on that side of the community will probably be more affected,” freshman Veronica Portnov said.

Despite the fear, a good set of Americans think Trump will be well fit to run this country. Some even feel the protests and fear are unnecessary.

“I’m ecstatic about Trump being president. People protesting are saying he will destroy the world while they’re out there doing it themselves, which I find hypocritical. They should just see what happens and let it be,” senior Anthony Grimando said.

Many make the argument that Trump is not against any of these communities or groups of people, saying that his campaign was taken and twisted to make it seem that way. Nonetheless, many of the stands Trump took on certain topics have been inconsistent throughout his entire campaign. He’s changed his stance on multiple issues towards the end, such as his views on same-sex marriage and his “plan” for illegal immigration, as it seems, to gain votes when he felt threatened by Hillary Clinton’s popularity.

All in all, Donald J. Trump is not fit to run the United States. With his hateful views on multiple groups that make up a good percent of the country, there is no telling what he can do to harm them. The people of America elected such a hateful person as president, and many dread of what’s to come next.

 

Featured image attribution to Michael Vadon and Marc Nozell on Flickr.

1 Comment

  1. Billy C. December 18, 2016 at 1:24 PM

    “With his hateful views on multiple groups that make up a good percent of the country, there is no telling what he can do to harm them. The people of America elected such a hateful person as president, and many dread of what’s to come next.”

    This is completely untrue.
    1) Hillary is an even more hateful person that has spread lies and corruption. In fact, SHE HAS OPENLY OPPOSED GAY MARRIAGE. She’s the one who changed her opinion.
    2) This presents no evidence besides people’s OPINIONS.
    3) Trump is not spreading “Hate.” He is stating what Hillary and the entire government have failed to do. The government works for us. HILLARY’s TAX PLAN WILL COST MIDDLE CLASS AMERICANS MORE MONEY. That’s hate.

Leave a comment

Back to Top

WJPS News switched from a monthly newspaper (named The Blazer) to an online convergent media site. Now, working with the school’s broadcast, The Highlight and the yearbook The Byline, we are hoping to bring the information for students to one place.

Search