The Blazer

The Student News Site of World Journalism Preparatory School

Flushing, New York

The Blazer

The Blazer

Memorial Day
Memorial Day
May 28, 2024
Coachella 2024
Coachella 2024
May 23, 2024
Senioritis
Senioritis
May 23, 2024

Greeks show their pride at the annual parade

by Markella Giannakopoulos, co editor in chief

The Tsoliades, also known as the Presidential guard, flew in from Greece to participate with other communities in the Greek Independence Day Parade. Photo by Markella Giannakopoulos.

Thousands of Greeks flocked to Fifth Avenue to watch with pride as dozens of floats, groups, associations, and churches walked and waved the Greek flag or held banners.

On March 29th, the words Zito i Ellada (translated to Long live Greece) were in the mouths of everyone cheering.

At the 77th annual Greek Independence Day Parade, the first to march was Mayor Bill De Blasio along with various dignitaries and other honored politicians from Greece. They stood proud among the sunshine and cheering people as they walked from 64th street to 79th street.

“There was a huge turnout from people all over the tri-state area.The weather was also better the last few years so many people came,” Miss Greek Independence Claudia Giannakopoulos said.

Hundreds of groups marched to commemorate the day the Greek overthrew their Turkish rulers on March 25, 1821. This was the day where they were finally free after 100 years of Turkish rule.

Symbolizing their independence, Claudia Giannakopoulos, participated in the event by standing on a float along with other girls who represented the different regions of Greece, such as Miss Crete and Miss Rhodes.

“Being able to see my friends and family cheering me on was great. I was happy to show my support of Greece especially during their economic crisis they are experiencing. It was a fun way to show my Greek pride,” Giannakopoulos said.

Some of the marchers included churches from all over the tri state area, different schools and colleges, as well as different associations. The organizers of the event, the Federation of Hellenic Societies of Greater New York, registered over 100 participant groups.

Incorporated throughout the parade were those dressed in traditional attire as they would have worn during the war of independence. Men wore the typical tights, pleated skirt, red beret, vest, and black pompom shoes. Women and girls wore the typical long brightly colored skirt, vest, long sleeved shirt, and head kerchief decorated with coins along the edge.

“I marched with the Pontiac Society because on my mom’s side we have people from that island. I loved waving and when I was holding the giant greek flag I loved that there were other people cheering them on,” senior Tina Kouridakis said.

Throughout the day, spectators enjoyed the sunshine as they watched groups walking past and showing off their pride.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

All The Blazer Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *