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Flushing, New York

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Feasting on foods from all around the world

by Kay Kim, staff reporter

“It was my advisory 10 years ago [that started the tradition]. They wanted a special way to show they were thankful ­ not only to WJPS, but to everything,” social studies teacher Ms. Fong said. Photo attributions to Kay Kim.
“It was my advisory 10 years ago [that started the tradition]. They wanted a special way to show they were thankful ­ not only to WJPS, but to everything,” social studies teacher Ms. Fong said. Photo attributions to Kay Kim.
Varying from the traditional mashed potato and turkey to spinach pie, sushi, empanadas and foods from many diverse cultures, students and staff brought in food to celebrate Thanksgiving.

There were many types of food, including: main dishes, side dishes, drinks, and desserts from many different cultures, including, but not limited to Greek, Hispanic, Korean, Malaysian, Chinese, and American. It was comparable to a full course buffet.

“It was my advisory 10 years ago [that started the tradition]. They wanted a special way to show they were thankful – not only to WJPS, but to everything,” social studies teacher Ms. Fong said.

Anyone who brought in food or drinks were given a stamp, which acted as a ticket to the Multicultural Thanksgiving Feast. There was a diverse set of homemade and store bought food. While desserts and drinks were mostly store bought, meals were hand cooked by parents or the students themselves.

“I brought in coconut pastries. My country uses a lot of coconut in our desserts. It [coconut] is one of the main things that they grow. I’m proud that people liked the food I brought in,” sixth grader Aliyah Uddin said.

Student ambassadors and members of the Fashion Club helped Ms. Fong prepare for the feast. They collected food and stamped the students’ hands in the morning. Once this was done, they organized the hot food from the desserts.

After the food was organized, it was distributed into the two serving lanes. Equal amounts of similar or the same foods, drinks, and desserts were divided among the lanes.

Serving started fourth period with the sixth graders. Two grades were called every period to come and celebrate the feast.

“They [the food] tasted very good. I never get to have those food on a daily basis. I really liked the dumplings because I don’t usually have dumplings,” freshman Veronica Layman said.

However, those who were serving and moving the traffic of students had antithetical opinions from those who enjoyed the food that was served to them.

“It was hectic when each class came in and we had to tell them that if you got food from one side, you can’t go to the other side for food.  I helped to organize the situation by making the announcement about it every time a class came in,” junior Renee Choong said.

Despite the opinions of the students, Ms. Fong felt that the feast was smoother this year as there was less traffic jams.

“I hope more and more people realize it [the feast] is not something that will go away. The 10 year mark shows that it is something solid,” Ms. Fong said.

As the feast progresses each year from the ten year mark, she hopes that everyone will contribute something for a greater turnout.

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